Just try to imagine East Hampton without its bays, waters, and ocean beaches! Just try to imagine East Hampton without its bays, waters, and ocean beaches!
Just try to imagine East Hampton without its bays, waters, and ocean beaches!
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… which is why we’ve made code enforcement a top priority. … which is why we’ve made code enforcement a top priority.
... which is why we’ve made code enforcement a top priority.
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…which is why we are preserving historical structures in Sag Harbor. …which is why we are preserving historical structures in Sag Harbor.
...which is why we are preserving historical structures in Sag Harbor.
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… which is why we have acted aggressively to get the club scene under control. … which is why we have acted aggressively to get the club scene under control.
... which is why we have acted aggressively to get the club scene under control.
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Here’s just a partial list of what we’ve accomplished … Here’s just a partial list of what we’ve accomplished …
Here’s just a partial list of what we’ve accomplished ...
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A message from Councilwoman Sylvia Overby about airport noise. A message from Councilwoman Sylvia Overby about airport noise.
A message from Councilwoman Sylvia Overby about airport noise.
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…which is why we have acquired over 200 acres of open space, farmland, water access, and wetlands throughout town. …which is why we have acquired over 200 acres of open space, farmland, water access, and wetlands throughout town.
...which is why we have acquired over 200 acres of open space, farmland, water access, and wetlands throughout town.
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…which is why we are working hard to improve social services. …which is why we are working hard to improve social services.
...which is why we are working hard to improve social services.
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The Final Results

With only a few votes difference between them on Election Day, David Calone and Anna Throne-Holst, had to wait until 1600 absentee ballots were counted. After the process was completed, Anna Throne-Holst was declared the winner and she will be the Democratic candidate who will run in the November election to defeat the present Republican congressman.

2016 News Updates

The Campaign Begins

Under the leadership of Judith Hope, the former Democratic East Hampton Town Supervisor, Jeanne Frankl, East Hampton Democratic Committee Chair, Betty Mazur, Vice Chair, & David Posnett long range plans for a successful Hillary Clinton campaign in District One were launched. In the first meeting a group of some other Democratic Committee members and interested volunteers expressed their commitment to a vigorous campaign. Among those attending the first session were members of the Anna Throne-Holst campaign committee. One thrust of the campaign will be to defeat the present Republican congressman Lee Zelden, who according to the NY times is one of the two strongest Trump supporters in Congress.

Springs Charettes

The Hamlet Studies began in earnest with a series of “charettes.” Starting in Springs, the first of the charettes began with a walking tour of some of the more heavily used properties in that hamlet, followed that same evening with a meeting at Ashawagh Hall of the days participants and others who live in Springs. People split into groups and sat at tables around large maps of their area and, with a few prompts, began to discuss their hamlet. Then a whole group discussion began. In each group, a chosen secretary presented the ideas each group had about issues that were important to Springs e.g. water quality, overcrowding of single family residences, highest school taxes in East Hampton, no increase in commercial development, protecting our natural resources while protecting our semi-rural character, etc. The issues were written on chart paper. The following evening the planners talked about their concerns for traffic, walkways, bike paths, and future development. A lively discussion followed in which there was much dissent. Citizens of Springs objected to the consultants’ vision of Springs that was presented, preferring their own.

Airport in 2016

Peter Kirsch and members of his company presented an overview of the effects of recent changes the present Town Board has made to the operations of the East Hampton airport. The courts have upheld all of the rules the Town initiated except the one limiting a particular aircraft to one round trip per week. This litigation was discussed at length. Evidence collected from the public at large via phone calls and e-mails recorded the frequency of flights that annoyed residents. The collected data was explained in charts and graphs. Members of the audience praised the board for bringing the airport under reasonable control and Councilwoman Kathee Burke Gonzalez who worked with the committees whose deliberations produced the new rules. Residents were urged to continue to report aircraft noise via phone calls and e-mails.

East Meets South

In a meeting held at the Bridgehampton Library, the local chapter of the League of Woman Voters presented the supervisors of the towns of Southampton and East Hampton, Jay Schniderman and Larry Cantwell, respectively, to a gathering of citizens. Each gave a short talk about the work they do. Schniderman who previously served as East Hampton’s supervisor and Suffolk County legislator, had recently assumed his present role, told how he was zeroing in on learning about the specifics of Southampton town, which is much larger.

When it was his turn to speak, Cantwell talked about land development and its effect on water quality and how the CPF fund, which would be voted on again in this year’s election for its recertification, would include a provision for monies to be spent on water quality. Supervisor Cantwell also spoke about climate change and coastal resiliency among other issues. The two men, who have known each other a long time, discussed other pressing issues that their towns faces, like affordable housing and repairing decaying infrastructure. Their talks were followed by questions from the audience.

A Committee with a Latin Beat

In an important first, our Town Board has appointed a Latino Advisory Committee. The purpose of this group will be to better integrate the Latino community into the life and political process of the town. Led by Maritza Guichey and Angela Quintero as co-chairs, with supervisor Larry Cantwell as Board liaison, its members include Diana Walker and Dan Hartnett and six other Latino residents. The committee was the brainchild of the Democratic Town Committee’s “New Leaders” mentored by Diana Walker. Among their activities was a public meeting in Town Hall on the new Rental Registry law that was recently presented. The law was discussed in English and Spanish.